Kids, Possibilities and God

Kids, Possibilities and God - Parenting Like HannahEverywhere you turn, it seems our world is filled with victims. Some indeed have had horrible, unspeakable things happen in their lives. Others have been convinced claiming to be a victim relieves them of responsibility for anything that does or does not happen in their lives.

Sadly, the victimization society is convincing our young people they are saddled with is preventing them from reaching their godly potential. It is keeping them from living the full, meaningful life God planned for them. It is allowing them to sit and watch as life and the adventures God had planned for them pass them by.

Enter Jen Bricker. Her new book, Everything Is Possible should be a must read for any young person who considers themselves a victim. If anyone could claim that status, it is Bricker. Born without legs, her father wouldn’t even let her mother see her as he quickly handed her over for adoption. She spent the first months of her life in foster care, before being adopted. Many people would have accepted the label of victim and gone on to live a very small, protected life.

Not Bricker. Her foster family was loving and her adoptive family believed she should try anything and everything and find ways to make it work. The book chronicles her childhood and the eventual adventures God gave her. Throughout it all, Bricker weaves her very strong faith in God and His plan for her.

For any who are tempted to dismiss her life as overly blessed (whatever that means), Bricker goes on to chronicle her foray into gymnastics. Imagine her shock when finding out years later the Olympic gymnast she most admired was actually her brith sister (who did not know Jen existed.). Even through the process of finding and attempting to build relationships with her birth family, Bricker never seems to feel sorry for herself or blame God for the events.

This is not a Pollyanna story though. It is the journey of a woman who allows God to shape and use her life. By knowing God and keeping following him her top priority, she is handle whatever happens. She admits she isn’t always happy, but even shares in spite of those times, she wouldn’t change anything about her life.

I strongly encourage you to read this book. It’s a fun, easy read. You and your teens and even older children will have to take another look at the challenges in your lives as you naturally compare them to those of Bricker. Your challenges may be greater or less than those she has faced. It is obvious though, refusing to view herself as a victim, but rather as someone God can use just as she is, makes all the difference. It is a vital lesson for your kids to learn and embrace.

 

 

This book was given to me for free in exchange for my honest review. An affiliate link is included for your convenience.

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Fix these words of mine in your hearts and minds; tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads. Teach them to your children, talking about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. (Deuteronomy 11:18-19 NIV)